Ms. Toody Goo Shoes

Ms. Toody Goo Shoes

I've hung up my dress-for-success clothes, and pulled my domestic "genes" out of storage.

Saturday, September 27, 2014

My Rosh Hashana Table, Doing a "Mitzvah," and the Legal Age for Eating Babka

Rosh Hashana Tablescape - Ms. Toody Goo Shoes

If you found several hundred dollars on the floor 
of a laundromat, what would you do with it?

I like to believe that I would not run right to the nearest Christian Louboutin store and by a killer pair of pumps. 
Of course I wouldn't.
They don't call me Ms. Goody Two Toody Goo Shoes 
for nothing, you know.
 
Rosh Hashana Tablescape - Ms. Toody Goo Shoes

I ask you, because on Thursday, the first day of Rosh Hashana (the Jewish New Year),
our Rabbi told a story of a man who,
many years ago, found $400 in a laundromat, 
and how his response in that situation,
had a profound affect on him 45 years later.

Rosh Hashana Tablescape - Ms. Toody Goo Shoes 
The Rabbi's sermon on the subject of doing a "mitzvah" 
(a good deed), was so powerful, 
 we were still talking about it that night
around the Rosh Hashana dinner table.

Part of the sermon was about Sam, an elderly man, 
who lived in a nursing home.
He was very active and alert,
and enjoyed participating in many activities.
One afternoon, he didn't show up for his favorite program.
The social worker was concerned,
and went to Sam's room to see if he was OK.

Rosh Hashana Tablescape - Ms. Toody Goo Shoes

Sam was lying on his bed, all dressed, 

as if he had someplace to go, yet, he wasn't going anywhere.
He looked extremely depressed.
The social worker finally got it out of Sam
that an aide had said something very cruel 
to him earlier in the day, and it upset him so much,
that it had zapped his will to do anything.

Rosh Hashana Tablescape - Ms. Toody Goo Shoes


The social worker sat and talked to Sam for awhile,
asking him lots of questions about his younger days. 
Eventually, Sam told the story about his job, many years ago,
 collecting coins from laundromats.
One day on his rounds, he found a roll of several hundred dollar bills on the floor. 
 Sam called his boss, asking if he could wait at the laundromat,
hoping that the person who lost the money, 
would come back to look for it.
His boss replied,
"I don't care what you do, but you do have a job to do,
and you better get it done."

Rosh Hashana Tablescape - Ms. Toody Goo Shoes

Sam decided he was going to wait, anyway.
Soon, a woman walked in looking extremely distraught.
"Has anyone found a roll of money?
It was the rent money I collected from our tenants,
and we'll have no money to pay our bills.
 My husband will be furious that I've lost it."
She was practically in tears.

Rosh Hashana Tablescape - Ms. Toody Goo Shoes
My grandmother's silver
Sam approached the woman,
saying he believed he had found what she lost,
and handed her the money.
She was enormously grateful, 
and so appreciative of Sam's honesty.
Sam left feeling good about the "mitzvah" he performed.

After he told this story to the social worker,
Sam was smiling, and seemed energized.
He was ready to go to the activity after all.


Rosh Hashana Tablescape - Ms. Toody Goo Shoes
Silver Kiddush Cup from our wedding

So what is the point of this story?
The good deed that Sam performed 45 years earlier 

lived within him, and had staying power.
All these years later, simply talking about it 
could invigorate his body and mind,
and lift him out of a depression.
Had Sam decided to keep the money,
 he may have felt good in the short term,
but it would not have the lasting effect 
that his act of kindness did.
And, eventually, he probably would have felt badly about keeping the money.

Translation: The Louboutins may look fantastic at first,
but, eventually, they're gonna hurt your feet.

Rosh Hashana Tablescape - Ms. Toody Goo Shoes

We told the story to Aunt Goo Shoes,
when she came for dinner...
or rather, when she brought most of the dinner 
that she had cooked for us. 

We had apples dipped in honey...
symbolic of hopes for a sweet year ahead...

Rosh Hashana Tablescape - Ms. Toody Goo Shoes

A round challah to symbolize the full circle of life...

Rosh Hashana Tablescape - Ms. Toody Goo Shoes

Matzoh ball soup, because it doesn't have to be Passover to enjoy it...

Rosh Hashana Tablescape - Ms. Toody Goo Shoes

Brisket, potato kugel and squash.

Rosh Hashana Tablescape - Ms. Toody Goo Shoes
I was too hungry to stage this photo!

And for dessert, there was chocolate babka.


Rosh Hashana Table -  Ms Toody Goo Shoes

Rewind about seven years...
Junior Goo Shoes was eight years old.
I asked him if he wanted a piece of babka.

He looked at me, kind of shocked, and said, 
"Mom! I'm not old enough for babka!"

HUH?

"You have to be 18 to have babka."

Ohhhhhh.....

"You mean vodka.  I am offering you babka - which is cake. 
The legal age for babka is 18 months, not 18 years...
you know, once you have teeth and can chew 
and swallow without choking."  

Ohhhhhh.....

Rosh Hashana Tablescape - Ms. Toody Goo Shoes


This year, when I gave him a some babka, I said, 

34 comments:

  1. You brought tears to my eyes, Ms. Toody Goo! Thank you for this post. The Louboutins are guaranteed to hurt your feet from what I have heard. I love the story about Jr. I thought the legal age for Babka was 21 ;)
    Have a blessed new year!

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    1. Thank you, Katie! I wish I had the sermon in writing, because the story as he told it, had everyone in tears. Isn't that funny about the babka?

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  2. Happy New Year! Was the Challah and Babka gone in 24 hours? It would have been in my house!!

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    1. The Babka was finished this morning (yes, Mr. GS had a piece), and there is a tiny piece of challah left, which I can't believe.

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  3. This was abolutely wonderful. Thanks for sharing the mitzvah story it warmed my heart. I also apprecite anyone in this day and age who understand the reason for our traditional holiday foods. These traditions have been handed down generation to generation and I hope it continues. Loved the Babka story.

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  4. I loved your story Amy. It is a good lesson for us all. Happy New Year to you and your family. I would love to see the recipe for the brisket. If you can, please share with us.

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    1. Thank you, glad you enjoyed. I will ask my sister for the recipe, and will share in a future post!

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  5. Very sweet post! I now want some apple slices with honey so I can insure a sweet year ahead, too. Babka looks delicious.

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    1. It can't hurt, to have a little honey and apples, so go for it, Barbara!

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  6. I loved the story... And you can always paint the sole of your shoes to fake Louboutin... I also love your silverware.

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    1. Thanks, Magali. Yes, I should invest in some red paint, LOL! Isn't that silverware fabulous? It was my grandmother's (who I never knew). It's silver plated, not sterling, and I love the pattern.

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  7. Amy, these were great stories to share. They both brought a wonderful feeling inside. Your Rabbi is so right. The story about your son, priceless. Beautiful table and good food. The apple slices and honey I never had, I may have to try some now. Happy New Year to you and your family.

    Cindy

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    1. Thanks, Cindy! Try the apples and honey - who couldn't use a little extra "luck" for a sweet year!

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  8. Wonderful story and a great lesson learned for the man who found the money. As for the Babka, I'm in my late 50's and have never had it!!!

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    1. Oh, you must try it AnnMarie! It's more like a bread (made with yeast, which is why I've never made it). I think of it as chocolate challah!

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  9. What a pretty table and food and such a nice story! Wishing you a nice weekend.
    Julie

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  10. What a great post! I felt like I was sitting at your beautiful table as your shared the Mitzvah story and the delicious food. Happy New Year my friend!

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    1. If only you were sitting there, Rosella! Thanks for the new year's wishes.

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  11. I love a good mitzvah story! Isn't it amazing how doing something for others can make you feel so good, even though you got nothing tangible from the act itself? Good deeds are contagious and we should all actively do them as often as possible - donate used clothing, make a meal for a homebound neighbor, even walk a dog for a friend while they are at work. I love Rosh Hashanah and use this season as a new beginning and to set intentions to do more good every day. Thanks for sharing your story!

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    1. It's so true, Beth. I just read something about how most of the things that we do to make a difference are small things - and they are hugely important. I've got to keep this feeling going!

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  12. Heartwarming story of goodness! He has been blessed without noticing.

    By the way my mothers name is toody!

    Xx
    Dore

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    1. Yes, I love this story! Oh, I love that your mom's name is Toody! I

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  13. Loved the story and especially the vodka / babka ....cute :)

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    1. One day he's gonna make me stop telling the vodka/babka story!

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  14. Beautiful post. Reminded me of a quick story. About 11 or 12 years ago, I was driving through my old neighborhood and I saw a girl in a physical altercation with a man. I pulled over, instructed this stranger to get in my car and drove off. The man was her boyfriend, abusive boyfriend. I dropped her at a friend's house. The friend thanked me (a lot) and I left. Five years ago and across the state, I am in petco and this girl says to me "Hey, you're the girl who saved my life!" Huh? What?
    She tells me the story and I of course remembered her. I never thought of it as saving a life, more just doing the right thing. It was nice to see her though. And your post reminded me how good it feels to do the right thing and that it CAN help you many years later. It's helped me today, thanks!

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    1. That's an amazing story! I'm so glad my story brought that good feeling back to you! Thanks so much for visiting!

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  15. Beautiful, festive table, wonderful story, and very 'fitting' moral!!;))

    Happy Rosh Hashana, Amy!

    Poppy

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  16. What a lovely story! Love the table as well...

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  17. I'm so glad I stopped by today. Your story warmed my heart, and your table was a feast for the eyes. An absolutely beautiful post. Thank you for sharing. Rosie @ The Magic Hutch

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  18. Wonderful story, beautiful table, delicious looking meal!! I realized on my way home from the grocery that I had forgotten to get a babka. Must get one soon... :-) L'shana tovah!!

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  19. What a sweet story! Such a lovely reminder of how good deeds affect the doer often more than the receiver.

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